Auto piloting our Actions: The Brain

Our brain is a masterpiece, use it

Auto-piloting our actions by training our brain.

A lot of our life activities are only difficult in the first stages of attempting; soon our brains master the various actions necessary and the whole process becomes automatic. This is one of the most intriguing characteristics of the human brain. As we grow up, the brain is tasked by a great number of actions we have to learn. Today you are learning how to write and tomorrow you are learning how to ride a

Today you are learning how to write and tomorrow you are learning how to ride a bicycle, or any other thing you may add on the list. You probably remember as you made your first step on the bicycle, and your brain got a new experience of cycling and attaining balance while at it. Soon your worries of falling off the bicycle disappeared and you were enjoying your ride down the road. You could now do it while you listened to your music or as you talked on the phone with one hand. It was all now possible compared to when you had just started to learn how to. You had now gained enough confidence to tell a beginner how easy it was to learn riding a bicycle. Well, the gist of this article isn’t about your feel-good moments of recommending learning cycling to another person; it is about you now trying the unicycle. Will you be the one now saying how impossible it is to ride one? Or will you be saying that since I learnt how to ride a bicycle, this too should be easy

Well, the gist of this article isn’t about your feel-good moments of recommending learning cycling to another person; it is about you now trying the unicycle. Will you be the one now saying how impossible it is to ride one? Or will you be saying that since I learnt how to ride a bicycle, this too should be easy or at least require similar efforts? I want you to now go beyond learning how to ride a bicycle/unicycle. The principle is the same, and now we need to apply it to something else. We know our brains are capable of doing or learning how to do most of the things we put our attention to.

We know our brains are capable of doing or learning how to do most of the things we put our attention to. For example two years ago I could hardly swim, and yet I had a burning desire to swim. I had previously played in shallow water pools and at beaches, but I could not propel my body within the vast water to at least imitate any water creature. Now after two years of learning how to swim – something which consumes about 4 hours of my month, I can say that, as much as I have not beaten Michael Phelps` record yet, I can lag behind him for about 10 seconds. For me, given my previous fears and weaknesses, I find this one of my biggest achievements in as far self-development is concerned.  But I want to use the example of swimming too to tell you about the automation of our brains. For example swimming entails making several movements; hands, legs, and others, in addition to breathing at the same time. To me, breathing while swimming was the hardest part in the beginning, let alone convincing my body that it shall not sink and get me killed altogether. All the necessary actions eventually became automated to the extent that once am in water, I don’t even have to think about them, but find myself doing them.

There are so many actions that have become part of my life just through conscious automation. More than 50% of my daily activities have become automated. The advantage that comes with this is the time and freedom you gain by concentrating and thinking about other things to better yourself. It all begins with taking a conscious effort in doing the things you do every day. It requires planning and sticking to routine; and continuing irrespective of the first failures. None of the difficulties along the way should make you lose focus of the bigger benefits; besides, the many times you fell off the bicycle didn’t stop you from continuing until you got hold of it. Soon enough you won’t even remember which part of your activities was hard in the beginning. You can apply this approach to most of the things you do, or find difficult doing, and soon they shall be part of your simple lifestyle. You don’t need to become a professional, but surely no one can deny that conquering your fears can be so motivating for bigger tasks.

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